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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
and the command staff. civil rights attorney john burris says that person is basically the chief of the police chief. >> this is a game changer in many ways, and so it should be felt all the way down to the officers on the street. >> reporter: burris insists the compliance director will not direct officers on how to did is -- on how to do their jobs on a daily basis. they would help opd finish a set of reforms ordered 10 years ago after a scandal. the compliance director will set policies to prevent police abuse, excessive force complaints and cut down on officer-involved shooting cases. one councilwoman says what oakland needs is a new leader at the police department. not a paul ryan's director. >> the fact that we have people dying every few days in the city of oakland is a problem. >> reporter: a federal judge will have to sign off on the compliance director and he also gets to pick the person. civil rights attorney john burris says he wants to recommend a former police chief who has experience in dealing with the justice department to serve as compliance director. he wants someone with exp
of the arc of history and civil rights, given the fact that they're taking up both doma and prop 8. i wonder where you think roberts fits into all this. >> based on some of the other decisions he has made, i don't think he is quite as conservative as some people think. i think taking up the doma case is really important because we really need to have the defense of marriage act struck down. marriage in the states is great. but at the end of the day, there is an awful lot of benefits that come from the federal tax code, that people who get married need to enjoy if you're going to have a fair and equitable situation in society. so i think they made a big step forward here. and, you know, the court is a hard place to read. unfortunately, it's not like the election. well don't have nate silver to read every morning to tell us how it's going to turn out. but we'll all be watching closely. >> chris, there is a third issue that the justices haven't taken up yet, and that's an arizona law that bars some same-sex spouses from access to state benefits. where do we go on that? what happens to that issu
, or latino organizations, it's civil rights organizations, the labor movement, it's evangelicals, parts of the business community. there will be immigration reform in 2013 and the president will be forced to sign something that gets through congress whether he wants to or not. it's clear he does want to. >> it appears he wants to. the dream act, here we are in lame duck again, lame duck in 2010 was the great exciting moment for progressives. a thousand things that hadn't happened pineally happened. no particular conversation about another dream act again. >> let's keep in mind. i'm not as optimistic about the future of ledge indication as you. in the context of the immigration problem, immigration policy problem, let's say, in the united states, dreamers and the dream act is symbolic. it aekts a lot of people. it's symbolic in a universe where we have 10 million or 11 million or however many in the shadows. we have 141,000 visas a year. what the hell is that? >> it's that history, right? >> it is that history. >> it's bur okay tra advertised this kind of stuff. it's not a solution of ex
, and in some states it increased, like ohio. some civil rights leaders say it was those attempts at voter suppression that drove voters out to vote even if it meant standing in line for hours. what is clear is the republican party has a deeper problem right now. it's failing to attract minority voters largely due to the policies and the rhetoric some of its leaders and their cronies have been using. what's going on? what can the republican party do about it? big questions. j.c. watts, former u.s. congressman from oklahoma. and judith browne dianis. thank you so much. let me ask judith to start with some homework that we couldn't do but we're counting on to you do. people come up to me and said, i was so angry about some of the suppression talk and attempts in those 30-some states. african-americans would say i got out there and i voted. what evidence do you have that it really worked in favor, or rather put it this way, against the republicans for trying to do that? >> well, number one, we know that they tried to do it so that they could have partisan advantage, but we do know it backfire
passion reached so far, it influenced the causes of civil rights and the thawing of the cold war. >> reporter: dave brubeck was a jazz pioneer whose career spanned eight decades. a classically trained pianist and composer formed his first band in 1951. eight years later the album "time-out." made his name a household name. it included a composition his saxophonist paul desmond wrote. "take five" with its catchy rhythms and unusual beat became brubeck's signature. it was the first album to sell a million copies. >> rhythm is an international language. >> reporter: his quartet played for presidents and foreign leaders setting the mood for the historic reagan-gorbachev summit in moscow. >> all these people that almost hated each other were swinging. >> reporter: brubeck also used his music to unite a racially divided america becoming one of the first white jazz musicians to play in all black clubs. >> the more has changed with artists, all kinds of artists, the better this world will be. >> reporter: he devoted his life to that goal. he died in norwalk, connecticut, one day before h
civil rights and they said that the senate was ending revenge for gettysburg and the rules of the senate have lent themselves -- back then, it blocked civil rights but it wasn't a work a day kind of obstructionist. as horrible as it was blocking civil rights legislation. today is it is almost everything. you need 60 votes. it doesn't even -- the majority leader can't even bring a bill up to debate without a 60 votes if the minority wants to force 60 votes. that's got to change. the selection -- the confirmation of federal judges and less than cabinet level appointees, those kinds of things are just obstructionism, period. when in the past, we always were able to just bring it forward to get 51 votes. if you don't, you don't. some of these votes will be more aimed to that. certainly to give the minority rights to slow things down but not to block things. almost haphazardly the way they do. >> bill: otherwise it is the tyranny of the minority. >> it really has become that way. so much of what the preside
texas. he helped write the civil rights act of 1964, the voting rights act. he didn't care much for president nixon, even saying he would have voted to impeach him the day he was inaugurated but it wouldn't have looked good. he helped draft nixon's articles of impeachment. brooks ran the kennedy presidential campaign in his texas district. he was also there the day he was killed and stood next to lyndon johnson as he was sworn in on air force one. by the way according to "the new york times", one of johnson's aides said brooks was one of the few men johnson was ever afraid of. brooks died at a baptist hospital from a sudden illness. he was 89 years old. >>> well, the president and republicans agree on very little in their fiscal proposals. with one glaring exception. neither proposal specifically includes defense cuts. in fact, both sides have gone out of their way to say they shouldn't happen. but if there's no deal, they may happen anyway. in today's "deep dive" how the sequester could impact our military, our economy, and our safety. the budget control act calls for about a t
countries that have no beliefs in civil liberties, countries who are terrible on human rights, and we say we're going to put you in charge of decisions -- >> that's not what it does. it forces them to live up to standards that we believe in. >> no, it doesn't. where does it say in there the other countries will live up to our standards? >> that's what the treaty does. it sets down standards. >> it does not say -- >> john, happy holidays. bob shrum -- >> -- giving away all our power. >> sometimes it comes down to how we look at the world. >>> republicans made no secret to keep democrats from voting. is it possible those voter i.d. laws, the photo i.d. laws, actually encouraged african-americans among others to defy the gop and go out and vote. i feel it happened. i have heard that happened. let's hear about it. did it happen? did blacks and others say screw you, you're not going to stop me from voting. let's find out how it worked. tonight, we host "the washington post" report and hear reporting of the university of notre dame that have caused serious claims. finally, what's the most iconic 2
leader and role model. he supported civil rights bills, refused to sign the southern manifesto in 19 of a an helped write the historical civil rights act. may we also remember congressman jack brooks. he was a great man, a political figure, a u.s. marine veteran and a friend that i'll never forget. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: thank you. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: ask unanimous consent to address how it's for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. poe: mr. speaker, starting at the age of 15, i worked any job i could find to support myself throughout college. manually dug ditches, construction work, plant work. after college i found an entry-level position in the field in which i sturdied. and with hard work i have constantly been employed for 36 years and now i'm near retirement. i've never requested or received any federal financial assistance. i enjoy contributing to my community and my church and this is my american dream. now this administration want
with you. >> my ministry, went through the civil rights movement, as you know. went to college and got a b.s. degree, first in my family, then a masters degree. then i worked three years at university tennessee. only black people out of 3,000 national scientists. that was a good experience for me. i came to washington in 1965 to head the student-run -- >> before the district had home rule or anything like that. >> so for 31 years, from school board to counsel at large, four terms as a mayor, another fourth term -- >> just re-elected. >> just re-elected. 16 years of mayor, it's a long time before anybody will come close to it. it's good if you do two terms, as you know, kennedy one term, and that's a trend now. this job is a different kind of job now. when i was in it, we had more resources. there's no textbook on being mayor so i learned the hard way by doing. i have been very, very successful in a whole bunch of programs. if you're going to look -- >> tell people about this. in 1980s. >> it was a sleepy, southern town with two or three-story buildings all over, including k street downtown
more moderate. i would say that you were 100% right. there is a civil war going on among the leadership. remember, the leader used to brag about they didn't have leaders and what happened was they were hijacked by big money. that's what happened to the tea party. they are not the same tea party that you and i -- remember in that march when we walked past the demonstration on the lincoln memorial? that's not the same tea party that evolved. >> former congressman joe perriola and joe madison, thanks for coming on tonight. >> thanks. >>> protests pepper sprayed in michigan. the president just responded. big story tonight. >>> and a memo to the gop, when you've lost ann coulter on taxes, you know you're in trouble. stay with us. >>> we've told you how papa john's ceo is eating his words after criticizing the health care law. but he's not the only one. darden's restaurant which owns olive garden and red lobster and other chains says it will cut full-time hours so they wouldn't have to give them what was health insurance. they want service treated right and darden's anti-health care crab fest
civil commitment. >> professor. >> i'm going to add, do this a little bit shorter, i think, which is let's start with a question to everybody in the audience. all right, so if you like chocolate cake, raise your left hand. if you do not like chocolate cake, raise your right hand. all people who like chocolate cake left hand, don't like chocolate cake right hand. all right, hands down. how many people found it difficult to raise your hand by yourself? not very many. great, you made a choice. you thought about it. you decided and you acted. and my concept of what free will is the ability to act consistent with your preferences and desires. just that simple. now how many people here feel like you have control over whether or not you like chocolate cake? raise either hands. fewer, right. so there are two different things going on that we often conflate when we talk about free will. one is your predispositions to preferences and desires, ok. that may be impulsivity, that may be violence, that may be anti-social personality disorder, that may be a preference for chocolate cake, a preference fo
from demanding respect for civil and political rights." end quote. the cuban government should release all political prisoners. the cuban government should also release allen gross, the american who has been jailed for more than three years now for distributing telephones in cuba. as i understand it, he is in poor health and a humanitarian parole is more than justified. when we hear about the cuban government's policies toward its people, the repression of their basic freedoms, the persecution of political dissidents, it's understandable to want to punish the government and to weaken it so that it collapses. we have to ask ourselves if our goal is to punish the cuban government or instead to help the cuban people. our goal should be to help the cuban people. further, we have to ask ourselves whether continuing the embargo will accomplish that goal. in my view, the answer is clearly no. it defies belief and 50 years of historical evidence to think that continuing the embargo will result in the toppling of the castro regime. that regime has survived 50 years of sanctions. fidel castro is
: right now new violence in syria's civil war. state media there saying 29 students and a teacher were killed when a mortar slammed into a school outside damascus. and we have this. new amateur video said to be showing a government warplane on a bombing run over a damascus suburb. it is home to many rebels and their supporters. we can not confirm the authenticity of that video but we have no reasondoubt it e. conor powell live from jerusalem. >> reporter: jon, it appears the war in syria is entering a new phase. in recent days and weeks the syrian government faced a real military setback as rebels begin to advance towards damascus. that is one of the reason we've seen intense fighting around damascus and more and more of the syrian jets making bombing runs trying to attack the syrian opposition groups. the fear if the syrian government, the assad regime feels their grip is beginning to loosen and slip away that they will turn to chemical weapons. there is evidence according to u.s. around national intelligence officials say that the assad regime is beginning to prepare their chemical a
pherson "war on the waters" and craig, the civil war at sea, very handsomely done, are both out. that's good because we get to resume our -- we barely scratched the surface. let's get right to it because we spoke for an hour last time, we got to about january 1862. so i will assume you all know about 1861, and get to something that jim pointed out. that was rather interesting. is that 150 years ago this month, besides all the other things that were going on, the realization that lincoln had promulgated -- [inaudible] the union had commenced -- the tennessee cumberland and mississippi rivers seems to belong to the north, not the south. and i must've seen for a time in 1862 that the combination of events, particularly the successes of the union were about to end the war between the states. and then the trend line shifts. being the father of water that lincoln was now became vexed all over again. jim talent start with you. what happened and why? >> well, the union navy was on a roll in the fall and winter of 61 and 62, in the spring of 62. and it looked like they were going to open up the missi
a great night. we'll see you right back here tomorrow. ♪ lou: the obama administration tonight ramping up diplomatic efforts to end seer -- syria's bloody civil war and the fear assad could use chemical weapons against his own people. the military is prepared to use poisen gas bombs, secretary of hillary clinton flew to dublin to hold a meeting with her russian counter part and u.n. enjoy to syria meeting to discuss how they would end the now 21-month long conflict in syria and how to move assad from power. and there's no sign they had to reverse the support, and today, a senior lawmaker says the syria government is now incapable of functioning properly. just before the meeting with the russian foreign minister, secretary clinton insisted that the united states and russia share common goals in the region. >> trying hard to work hard with russia to stop the bloodshed in syria and begin a political transition to a post asad future. the pressure against the regime in and around damascus seems to be increasing. lou: at home, leon pa net fa issuing the -- panetta issuing the sharpest warning y
decision and new job. and syria's civil war is in a very dangerous perhaps decisive tipping point right now. can the world prevent bashar al assad from using chemical weapons against his own people? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with president obama taking his battle to extend tax cuts for the middle class into the heart of the middle class suburb today. he visited a family just outside washington, d.c., using their story to dramatize what will happen in just 26 days if he and congress can't make a deal on the so-called fiscal cliff. a source of great concern for so many people, everyone's taxes will go up, will go up if there's no deal. let's go live to our white house correspondent dan lothian. he's on the scene for us over at the white house. how did it go, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, we've seen the president do this before in the past whenever he's locked in negotiations with lawmakers. he heads out on the road, either goes to a backyard or sits down around a dinner table to put pressure on congress. that's what he did today when he went to falls churc
for 35 years. right now same-sex marriage is legal in nine states and the nation's capital while civil unions are available in five other states. >>> smoke them if you got. r recreational marijuana is now legal washington state. pot smokers lit up like it was new year's eve. the new voter approved initiative went into effect at midnight. technically this is illegal. for now the seattle police department is turning a blind eye. last night this notice was sent out to all officers. "until further notice, officers shall not take any enforcement action other than a verbal warning for violation of 1-502." what was it like? >> reporter: well, it was certainly interesting. something different -- more different than anything i've been to before. it's a first step in a long implementation process in washington state. by the end of the year there will be pot shops on the streets throughout washington state. there will be legal pot growers. there will be pot processors. they will make everything from cigarettes and cigars to cookies and brownies if they can sell them, if they want to sell them. th
be new hopes for international agreement on how to end syrian's 21-month-old civil war. secretary of state, hillary clinton, will be meeting today with the russian foreign minister. this is secretary clinton in dublin ireland today for a human rights conference. but behind closed doors, she will be meeting with her russian counterpart and that u.n. envoy talking about syria. the u.s. and russia have been on opposite sides of that conflict in sirah -- conflict in syria. however today's meeting is suggesting a possible compromising. all of this comes as fox news reports, the syrian military is mixing deadly chemical weapons. the syrian government has not confirmed they have these weapons, saying only it could not use -- it would not use that type of weapon against its people. president obama has warned of serious consequences if the syrian government uses those chemicals in that civil war. >>> allegations of spying on the high seas. the america's cup controversy involving the oracle racing team. >>> and we're looking live outside of traffic. that's the bay bridge toll plaza. tara is
to this decendant of that legendary civilization. olympia is a true leader who has always devoted her considerable intellect, energy and commitment to doing what was right for maine and for america. olympia snowe has dedicated her life to public service. 18 years in the united states senate preceded by 16 representing maine's second congressional district, plus 5 in the maine legislature add up to a remarkable record of commitment to our nation and the great state of maine. but that span of nearly four decades tells us only part of the story. for olympia has truly set the gold standard for public service. from the statehouse to the u.s. capitol, olympia has built an outstanding reputation as an informed, thoughtful and effective legislator. she can always be counted on as a leader with integrity who pursued solutions and who had no interest in just scoring partisan political points. it is olympia's character that has made all that difference. mr. president, the private acts of public figures can tell you a lot about their character, so i want to share with my colleagues this morning a story about
the civil society organizations and others were standing on the side lines here. they have to do private city along the same line. right now i think the u.s. policy, and again, u.s. government policy that those of you i think in the civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here where there's a desire among the political forces including the under islamists who want to bring about change in their political movement and were for the large part sitting on the side line here and we need to do more. >> we do need to move on to the q&a portion here. i would like to take a few questions from the audience the if you have a question raise your hand. we have migrants' circulating and we will take ten minutes before we begin to wrap up. >> i'm on the center for democracy and human rights in saudi arabia in washington, d.c. what's missing over on these discussions which i tend to miss them less and less is the fact that islamists haven't been told all along. the other point is there is a new generation who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. what we should be focusi
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)